Walk for Tibet Ends Journey in Toronto

PRESS RELEASE

For Immediate Release

October 28, 2010

Contact:

Jigme Norbu, Walk for Tibet

Tenzin Wangkhang, Students for a Free Tibet Canada

Walk for Tibet: Indianapolis to Toronto Ends Journey in Toronto

Participants Walk for World Peace, Human Rights, and Tibetan Independence

[TORONTO] – Dozens of Tibetans and their supporters gathered this evening at the Chinese Consulate in Toronto to welcome Jigme Norbu (son of Takster Rinpoche and nephew of His Holiness the Dalai Lama) and accompanying walkers Kunchok Gompo of Madison, Wisconsin and Tai Nguyen of Bloomington, Indiana as they completed their journey of Walk For Tibet: Indianapolis to Toronto. The walkers arrived at the Chinese Consulate at 6:30pm Thursday evening to the cheers of welcoming supporters. The journey began on October 10, 2010 from Indianapolis and had covered over 500 miles, all to share the message of world peace, human rights, and the Tibetan struggle for independence.

“The Tibetan struggle for peace and human rights isn’t just a Tibetan issue, it is a global issue,” Jigme Norbu told the crowd of supporters at the Chinese Consulate. “Although this journey may be difficult at times, what keeps me going is the six million Tibetans, inside Tibet today, that have been suppressed for over six decades by a Communist regime.”

“Jigme Norbu and Walk for Tibet is not only inspiring for Tibetan people, but for all people of conscience who want to live in world encompassing peace and human rights for all,” said Tenzin Wangkhang, National Director of Students for a Free Tibet Canada. “This courageous initiative has no doubt touched and positively changed the lives of the many people they meet on their journey, all the while raising awareness of the continued brutality that exists in Tibet under illegal Chinese occupation.”

Jigme Norbu has completed more than 19 walks and bike rides and altogether has compiled over 6500 miles both in the United States and overseas for Tibet. The most recent walks Jigme has completed were in March of 2009 Indianapolis, Indiana to New York City which covered 900 miles. Also in May 2010, Jigme Norbu was joined by Tenzin Jamyang former President of the Tibet Alliance of Chicago in walking over 600 miles to Minneapolis from Indianapolis. Then in July, Jigme walked from Philadelphia to Washington D.C. in the memory of his late father, who spent his life fighting for Tibet’s Independence, as well as, in memory of all Tibetans who have died in peaceful protest to the brutal oppression of Tibet by the Communist Chinese Government over the last six decades.

As Jigme’s father always said, “Tibet belongs to Tibetans’ and Tibet has never been part of China.” Despite over 50 years of Chinese occupation of Tibet, the Tibetan people refuse to be conquered and subjugated by China. The present Chinese policy, a combination of demographic and economic manipulation, and discrimination, aims to suppress the Tibetan issue by changing the very character and the identity of Tibet and its people.

The 14th Dalai Lama of Tibet went to exile in India in 1959 along with over 100,000 Tibetan refugees. There he is established a democratic government in exile. In 1989 he was awarded the Noble Peace Prize for his non-violent struggle for Tibet. Currently he travels around the world, preaching the message of peace, nonviolence, inter-religious understanding, universal responsibility and compassion. Jigme’s journey ends shortly after the high-profile visit of His Holiness the Dalai Lama to Toronto last weekend.

For more information, visit: http://www.ambassadorsforworldpeace.org

#30#

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s